(Solved) We are all familiar with the innovative and futuristic designs of the Danish designer Verner Panton. He used colorful plastics to create new icons, like the Panton Chair.

(Solved) We are all familiar with the innovative and futuristic designs of the Danish designer Verner Panton. He used colorful plastics to create new icons, like the Panton Chair.

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LECTURE:

We are all familiar with the innovative and futuristic designs of the Danish designer Verner Panton. He used colorful plastics to create new icons, like the Panton Chair.

Panton Chair : https://www.dropbox.com/s/lv3207aur260ypf/Panton_Stuhl.jpg?dl=0

Project: Verner Panton, Visiona 2, Cologne, Germany 1970

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9LL6vB2ET4

http://www.verner-panton.com/spaces/archive/121/

Many of his designs are still in production today and have not lost any of their appeal. From today’s point of view, he might look like a beacon of playfulness, happiness and fun, but he was in fact part of a much larger group of very diverse thinkers and designers around the world.

While the avant-garde in Japan discussed the rebuilding of the country after the war and tried to combine new technology with ancient ideals, another avant-garde started to form itself in Europe.

It was on one hand a reaction to the work and writings of Team X, which had developed out of the modernist CIAM.

http://www.team10online.org

It was inspired by the originally American movement of Pop Art. Andy Warhol, the most famous artist in this area, took images and materials from American Consumerism and translated them into artwork that was at the same time critical of capitalism and the celebration of consumer goods, but also easy to consume by the public.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHBm8_ooPVo

The British architecture critique Reyner Banham was fascinated by the American culture and started to look at Los Angeles as the new utopia. He reinterprets the concept of the city in his book Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies.

 

Play Video

One idea he shared with Metabolism was the fascination with infrastructure. The usually hidden, technical cores would become the actual building.

Banham, Reyner. A Home is Not a House. in Joan Ockman ed., Architecture Culture 1943-1968: A Documentary Anthology. New York: Rizzoli, 1993. pg. 371-378.

Banham, Reyner. The Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment. In: Jencks, Charles and Karl Kropf (editors). Theories and Manifestos of Contemporary Architecture. Wiley-Academy, 2006.

Archigram, initially not a group, but a magazine, expanded on these ideas. The main members of the group were Peter Cook, Warren Chalk, Ron Herron, Dennis Crompton, Michael Webb and David Greene. They created fantastic visions for the future nomad.

Archigram. Universal Structure. In: Jencks, Charles and Karl Kropf (editors). Theories and Manifestos of Contemporary Architecture. Wiley-Academy, 2006.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMQGrF06uz8

Superstudio, a firm founded in 1966 in Florence, was even more radical in their approach.

Superstudio. Description of the Microevent/Microenvironment. In: Jencks, Charles and Karl Kropf (editors). Theories and Manifestos of Contemporary Architecture. Wiley-Academy, 2006.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=8&v=Io2nGHA-ug8

 

 

During this time period many utopian concepts were developed. The movie Great Expectations gives an overview of these architects, as well as current visionaries.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKp2qVEtQL0

You can find the full movie in our library

The World Exposition in Montreal in 1967 can be seen as the high, but also end point of these visions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEly-bm5eU0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blog 1

Online Discussions

On moodle three discussion fora with different topics have been established:

–       Rayner Banham Loves Los Angeles

Rayner Banham describes his fascination for Los Angeles in the BBC documentary. He reinterprets the city according to four ecologies. Is this still true for Los Angeles today? What has changed?

–       Archigram

Archigram embraces terms like consumerism and entertainment and make them part of their design strategies. Many critics considered this to be a shallow approach. What is your opinion about their approach?

–       Superstudio

Superstudio created a new, radical utopia in its projects. The projects were not meant to be actually built, but to create a critical discussion about the built environment and the way we live in it. Is this kind of ‘paper architecture’ of value?

Pick two of those and post one comment for each. Think about the given context of modernism and the reaction to it. What is of interest for you? How do you see your own work influenced by those concepts? Do you agree, or should Interior Architecture follow as a less critical direction? Your post can be a reaction to the readings, the links I provided, or another students post. Feel free to include links and images yourself.

Each:

Minimum 400 words

Include at least two external sources as references.

 

(PLACE YOUR ANSWERS FOR BLOG 1 HERE AND PLEASE SEPERATE THE TWO ANSWERS FROM EACH OTHER)

 

BLOG 1 PART 1:

 

BLOG 1 PART 2:

 

 

____________________________________________

 

In the 2nd half of the 20th century International Style was criticized from many sides. It was looked at as a style that lacked any relationship to location, history, or the user. We have already seen, how Pop Art and groups like Archigram and Superstudio tried to connect design back to the user, reintroduce fun and excitement through a direct interaction with the needs and desires of the client.

Another criticism was connected to the location of the buildings and its climate, social structure and the vernacular. The result of this criticism can be found in the movement of Critical Regionalism. It seeks to provide an architecture rooted on one hand in the modern tradition, but is also tied to the geographical and cultural context. It tries to mediate between the global and the local languages of architecture.

The term Regional Architecture was first introduced by Alexander Tzonis and Liane Lefaivre.

Tzonis, Alexander. Introducing and Architecture of the Present. Critical Regionalism and the Design of Identity. In: Lefaivre, Liane and Tzonis Alexander (editors), Critical Regionalism – Architecture and Identity in a Globalized World. Munich: Prestel, 2003. Pg. 8-21

Kenneth Frampton, who made the term popular and part of the larger architectural discussion, reinterpreted the concept. He was looking for a synthesis of modernism and regional traditions.

Frampton, Kenneth. “Prospects for a Critical Regionalism”.  Perspecta, Vol. 20. (1983), pp. 147-162.

‪KENNETH FRAMPTON: A Critical Voice

Frampton mentions a large list of architects from different backgrounds and regions as part of this concept. He includes Alvar Aalto, Jorn Utzon, Tadao Ando, Raffael Moneo, and Luis Barragan, just to name a few. One big difference to other movements is though that the designers themselves never operated from the point of view of a group. They are rather individuals that integrated concepts and ideas from their culture into their design. Theorists and writers like Frampton were the ones working it into a group.

 

One of the geographically closest architects mentioned by Frampton is the Mexican Pritzker Prize winner Luis Barragán. He was born in 1902 in Guadalajara, Mexico.

 

 

Project:

Luis Barragan House and Studio, Mexico City, 1947

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0Y8mCBql_w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0g-7HWL3vE

Play Video

Luis Barragán Foundation

It is easy to see, how Barragan integrated many vernacular elements in his design. From the vibrant colors to the rough textures to the use of light. But also traditional ways to deal with the local climate, like courtyards with water features, are an important aspect of it.

 

One additional example of the use of design principles that have been optimized over the centuries is the work of the Egyptian architect Hassan Fathy. He reintroduced traditional mud bricks as a contemporary building material and the use of Malqaf (Windcatchers)

Fathy, Hassan. Natural Energy and Vernacular Architecture. In: Jencks, Charles and Karl Kropf (editors). Theories and Manifestos of Contemporary Architecture. Wiley-Academy, 2006.

 

Blog 2

Online Discussions

On moodle three discussion fora with different topics have been established:

–           Critical Regionalism

–           Luis Barragan

–           Hassan Fathy

Pick two of those and post one comment for each. Think about the given context of modernism and critical regionalism as a reaction to it. What is of interest for you? How do you see your own work influenced by those concepts? Do you agree, or should Interior Architecture follow as a less locally founded direction? Your post can be a reaction to the readings, the links I provided, or another student’s post. Feel free to include links and images yourself.

Each:

Minimum 400 words

Include at least two external sources as references.

 

(PLACE YOUR ANSWERS FOR BLOG 1 HERE AND PLEASE SEPERATE THE TWO ANSWERS FROM EACH OTHER)

 

BLOG 2 PART 1:

 

BLOG 2 PART 2:

 

___________________________________________

In the 1990s a new thinking in design started to emerge, developing out of Deconstructivism in general and the office of Peter Eisenman specifically. Based on the writings of French philosophers like Deleuze and Guattari, the young architect Greg Lynn started to be more interested in the transitions and transformations of things, than there opposite. The hybrid and the fold became the new center of attention.

Lynn, Greg. Architectural Curvilinearity: The Folded, the Pliant, and the Supple. In: Sykes, Krista (editor). Constructing a New Agenda. Princeton Architectural Press, 2010.

Greg Lynn was influenced by new developments in Robotics and Artificial Intelligence. A problem could be solved not by analytical, or design thinking, but through the use of evolutionary principals in the scripting of genetic algorithms. The designer of a building, or a piece of furniture could develop a script in the computer, in which all internal and external factors (for example climate, orientation, body size, budget, taste, …) can be used as parameters in a computer program that would automatically result in a multi-function optimized product. It would be the perfect hybrid for the combination of parameters. The designers do not create the product, but rather the process that designs the product.

Lynn, Greg. Animate Form. In: Jencks, Charles and Karl Kropf (editors). Theories and Manifestos of Contemporary Architecture. Wiley-Academy, 2006.

For this process Greg Lynn initially (ab)used a software developed for animation. The movie ‘Toy Story’ was the first animated feature entirely built in Alias Wavefront (later on transformed into Maya). On a simplified level this software would allow a different kind of animation. Instead of drawing several key frames for a ball falling down and bouncing back up, for example, the animator would define the size of the ball, its viscosity, its weight, the gravity of the environment, possible wind, press start and the computer would calculate all resulting steps. In a similar way Greg Lynn tried to create buildings, creating the blobs.

Greg Lynn: Organic algorithms in architecture – TED Talk

Goulthorpe Mark. Notes on Digital Nesting: A Poetics of Evolutionary Form. In: Taylor, Marc and Julieanna Preston (editors), Intimus – Interior Design Reader. Wiley-Academy, 2006.

The first building that was actually designed and built according to these principles was the Yokohama Ferry Terminal by Foreign Office Architects. The young office won an international competition with an entry that didn’t look as intriguing as some of the others, but as it was based on the new thinking, proved to be the smartest solution.

 

Project: FOA, Yokohama International Passenger Terminal, Japan, 2002

AD Classics: Yokohama International Passenger Terminal / Foreign Office Architects (FOA)

The building itself had to be able to adjust to many parameters during the design process. The design approach allowed for those changes to be integrated seamlessly, as the architects didn’t have to redesign their genetic algorithm, but rather just change the parameters.

By now this approach has become much more accessible to designers with the use of software like Grasshopper, which most of you are by now familiar with.

Foreign Office Architects. The Yokohama Project. In: Jencks, Charles and Karl Kropf (editors). Theories and Manifestos of Contemporary Architecture. Wiley-Academy, 2006.l;

This building was at the starting point of a movement that would create hybrids between landscape and architecture. The projects started to transform into soft, undulating surfaces that would adjust to internal and external forces, just like a piece of clothing.

Lupton, Ellen. Skin: New Design Organics. In: Weinthal Lois (editor). Toward a New Interior – An Anthology of Interior Design Theory. Princeton Architectural Press, 2011.

As a reaction this a new criticism started to develop, stating that the architecture is starting to about surface, rather than space. We will look at this most recent step next week.

Blog 4

Online Discussions

Pick two of the recent blogs of your classmates and post a reply to it. Try to be critical, but also supportive. Do you agree with the author? Is the argument clear and intriguing? What interests you in it and how does it relate to your own work?

Each reply has to be a minimum of 200 words. You can also use images, illustrations, and external links to support your point.

 

My classmate 1:

[ Postmodernist architecture gives meaning to a lot of architecture project. The word of Postmodernism emerged in 1960 which was represented the high tendency, high-tech design, neo-classism, and deconstructivism. People showed their new architectural drawings and technologies, and these skills, such as geometrical lines and shapes, provide to the public as a new sensation. Out of the original and classic architecture style, many postmodern architects and designers have represented their ideas in a very geometrical and abstract way. These creative and conceptual architectures are still re-interpreting with different perspectives throughout the several generations.

I would like to talk about one of my project that I did for micro-housing. Thousands and millions of people are living in major cities, like L.A, New York, and San Francisco. Those cities have limited spaces. However, the populations are increasing every year. Therefore, living price per square foot has exploded. Not many people can afford to live in entirely accommodated houses or apartments. Thus, the Micro Units proposal had addressed in 2013 to solve the housing issues. Micro Units are tiny studio apartments, ranging from 300 to 450 square feet that allow lower-income tenants or buyers to enter the urban real estate market.

For micro housing, I had to design the space in 450 square feet flexible unit. However, to approach the final design, I had to think about different scenarios about eating, sleeping and working to understand about people’s primal life pattern. In a small space, designing for people’s fulfillment and satisfaction was very hard, and I had to think in various perspectives. To solve the space problem, I figured out the multi-usage of furniture plays essential rules for people because furniture makes space complete way and identify the area. Therefore, I focused on designing the furniture for micro units. The furniture is made of one type of wood, and it is all connected. Several different sizes of wood blocks consist of the one big furniture, but it can always be detachable. Based on my previous scenarios, speakeasy bar/café, sleeping area, and lawyers office were helpful to finalize the furniture. Every design narrated the story of the space. Space identified the purpose of the plan. The furniture for micro-units offers two people sleeping place with different levels for the private moment, long and narrow workspace, 12 people seating and dining areas. Also, people can project the movies or videos using window shaped furniture. The structure of the furniture gives enough story about the people’s movement and activity.

Studying an interior architecture, every time, I learned so many things step by step. Through this project, I genuinely considered about space planning and internal architectural materials. The user’s movement and lifestyle are significant for arranging the furniture and designing the space. Throughout the project, it is hard to say the whole furniture is representing the postmodernist architecture. Moreover, I was not dealing with the entire structure to look like the building is very abstract and geometric way. However, it is impressive way designing furniture for such a small space. I was trying to put little gaps and deep spaces from the furniture that people can utilize the area as much as possible.

In my opinion, the furniture for micro-units is fit and well-suited. There are so many significant values about the furniture that can make the space bigger of area availability. It has a lot of storages and people can store them nicely and neatly to make the whole space look cleaner. Moreover, the furniture is connected and made of one material, so it gives unity. This furniture is not solid bottom type; it can always go movable when people need to make the other space bigger especially closet and living area. ] – Sung Hee Lee

 

(Your response here)

 

Classmate 2:

 

[The design of this project seeks to negotiable a dialogue between the inhabitants and an engagement with the skateboard culture that was created in Venice during the 1970s. Moreover, an exploration of this relation as an effort to connect the culture of the hostel and the culture of Venice beach produces a hybrid programmatic condition where recreation and living and interwoven.

The form of this project created under the idea of Postmodern architecture which is a style or movement which emerged in the 1960s as a reaction against the austerity, formality, and lack of variety of modern architecture, particularly in the international style of architecture. The form was created by combining two cylinders and one cute. The cylinder volume design or skateboard circulation and skate area and the cute volume design for hostel, restaurant, and gym which follow idea of asymmetrical and oblique form that introduce the irregular geometry into a regular form, the benefit of this experiment is enrich the experience of  playing and living at the same time. The form of the skate park created by place two skate bowl against each other also allows the player to play within and on top of the skate bowl. The design of skate ramp took the idea from Binoculars Building designed by Frank Gehry in Venice. The front corner of his project  have a giant binocular sculpture to coving the car entrance which allows people to pay attention to this project from far away. The ramp is also placed at the corner of the project that allows the tourist to see it when they walk along the walk path of Venice beach. The interior space of this project created by regular straight wall combined with irregular skate bowl to provide double height space and losing some percentage of floor area to allow tourist to see how player to skate in skate board park that in front of their rooms. The design of the section using the idea of stack, hole, and shape which has the regular ceiling height, double height space and special negative space create by skate bowl, ramp and ceiling. The overall benefit that I earn from this experiment is having the opportunity to challenge the way to create the form and not only using the irregular form or scale to catch the attention from people, but also create the program within the irregular geometry.

The program of the project divided into five types of program such as hostel, retail space, skateboard park, gym, and restaurant. The restaurant has a double height space allows the light path thought the horizontal openings, in addition, this is the best place to see the skateboard lovers to play in the skate area. In addition, the five sense of human experience are fully filled by the light, sound, smell, texture, food in that space. The skateboard park in this project structured by three sections; the area for beginning player located on the roof top, the area for advanced player located in the front corner of the building, the circulation ramp for all players can lead the each player run thought each floor. The hostel program is perfect for tourist to stay overnight and experience the beautiful sunset of Venice beach.

The idea of postmodernism allows us to enrich the way to create from to against the international style of architecture which can provide opportunity for people to experience the unique space, but that is not enough for provide the wellbeing and happiness for the occupier , as a designer we need to learn other design strategy to help us to make positive and intelligent decision in order to design better project. ] – Fei Ye

 

(your response here)

 

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By | 2018-07-25T19:58:50+00:00 July 25th, 2018|Uncategorized|