(Solved) One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider

//(Solved) One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider

(Solved) One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider

One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider
the following questions:
Ÿ- Who is/are the author(s)?
E.g., agendas, biases, social and historical context, if known?
Ÿ- What is his/her/their central/main argument or thesis?
-Ÿ How is it defended? What are the supports, assumptions, modes of reasoning, structure, etc.?
Ÿ- What are the strengths and weaknesses of the above?
Ÿ- Are you being reflexive about your own reactions, assumptions, etc.?
Ÿ-How do the concepts relate to the theoretical and/or methodological themes
and concepts from lecture and other readings?
*You should avoid focusing on trivial/peripheral details.
Paper Comments Rosaldo: Introduction (1993), Preface, Introduction (“Grief and a Headhunter’s Rage”)
• Ember, Ember, and Peregrine (2011): “History of Anthropological Theory” (pp. 14–20)
• Sluka & Robben (2012): “Fieldwork in Cultural Anthropology: An Introduction” (pp.
1–12)

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By | 2018-07-25T13:25:38+00:00 July 25th, 2018|Anthropology|0 Comments

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