(Solution Available) One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider the following questions:

(Solution Available) One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider the following questions:

One response (e.g., question, analysis, critique) to each reading, etc.To write better discussions points (and to get more out of reading, in general), consider
the following questions:
Ÿ- Who is/are the author(s)?
E.g., agendas, biases, social and historical context, if known?
Ÿ- What is his/her/their central/main argument or thesis?
-Ÿ How is it defended? What are the supports, assumptions, modes of reasoning, structure, etc.?
Ÿ- What are the strengths and weaknesses of the above?
Ÿ- Are you being reflexive about your own reactions, assumptions, etc.?
Ÿ-How do the concepts relate to the theoretical and/or methodological themes
and concepts from lecture and other readings?
*You should avoid focusing on trivial/peripheral details.
Paper Comments Rosaldo: Introduction (1993), Preface, Introduction (“Grief and a Headhunter’s Rage”)
• Ember, Ember, and Peregrine (2011): “History of Anthropological Theory” (pp. 14–20)
• Sluka & Robben (2012): “Fieldwork in Cultural Anthropology: An Introduction” (pp.
1–12)

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By | 2018-07-07T04:00:52+00:00 July 7th, 2018|Anthropology|