One of the remarkable features of Indian Sufi literature is the way it incorporates figures, practices, and doctrines drawn from the South Asian religious world

//One of the remarkable features of Indian Sufi literature is the way it incorporates figures, practices, and doctrines drawn from the South Asian religious world

One of the remarkable features of Indian Sufi literature is the way it incorporates figures, practices, and doctrines drawn from the South Asian religious world

One of the remarkable features of Indian Sufi literature is the way it incorporates figures, practices, and doctrines drawn from the South Asian religious world. A key figure in this Sufi literature is the yogi (also jogi). For this forum, you will need to consult both Mirigavati and Digby’s “Medieval Sufi Tales of Jogis” (in the Syllabus V B readings folder on GS), especially tale #2, which is told by the Chishti Sufi saint Gesudaraz.

How are yogis portrayed in these two stories (Mirigavati and Gesudaraz’s tale #2)? Who are they? How do they appear? What do they do that makes them yogis? How do they affect others? Pick at least one passage in Mirigavati to exemplify your answer (note: the passage must be from the poem, not Behl’s introduction).

Why do you think Muslim Sufis would be interested in telling stories about yogis?

For purposes of this assignment, a yogi (f. yogini) is someone who practices yoga. Yoga involves acts of meditation, concentration, and asceticism, as well as bodily exercises involving breath control and other movements.

Digby, Medieval Sufi Tales of Jogis
Asani, Ajmer--Dargah of Kwaja Muinaddin Chishti

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By | 2019-11-29T08:37:31+00:00 November 29th, 2019|Religious Studies|0 Comments

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