In “How ‘Bigger’ Was Born,” Wright makes this striking observation about Native Son, the book he wrote after Uncle Tom’s Children

//In “How ‘Bigger’ Was Born,” Wright makes this striking observation about Native Son, the book he wrote after Uncle Tom’s Children

In “How ‘Bigger’ Was Born,” Wright makes this striking observation about Native Son, the book he wrote after Uncle Tom’s Children

In “How ‘Bigger’ Was Born,” Wright makes this striking observation about Native Son, the book he wrote after Uncle Tom’s Children: “I swore to myself that if I ever wrote another book [after Uncle Tom’s Children], no one would weep over it; that it would be so hard and deep that they would have to face it without the consolation of tears” (xxvii).

What specific aspects of the movie version of Native Son are similar to the novel version? What specific aspects are different?

How do the differences between the novel and the film account for their respective power and critical reception? In other words, what was the initial critical reception of Wright’s novel, and what was the critical reception for Native Son (the 1986 and, if you are interested, other, earlier movie versions)? IMDB is a useful resource for this question.

If you find that novel is less “hard and deep” than the book, how does this fact reduce Wright’s sworn aims for Native Son?

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By | 2019-10-16T07:15:04+00:00 October 16th, 2019|Literature|0 Comments

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