(FULL COURSE DONE) PSY-7106 Quantitative Research Design

(FULL COURSE DONE) PSY-7106 Quantitative Research Design

Course Code and Title:

PSY-7106 Quantitative Research Design

Course Credits:

3

Course Description:

In this course, students will examine the principles of quantitative research methods. Students will develop skills essential for designing experimental, quasi-experiment, and survey studies; analyzing the data collected in these studies, and interpreting the results of data analyses. Students will explore designs and statistical techniques that could be used with their envisioned dissertation project research. Other topics to be covered include data presentation and statistical analysis, description and testing of relationships, cause-and-effect of relationships, and quantitative survey research.

Number of Assignments:

12

Course Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify the types of quantitative research design.
    2. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.
    3. Analyze ethics in quantitative research.
    4. Examine validity and threats to validity in quantitative designs.
    5. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.
    6. Compare the roles of sampling techniques in quantitative designs.
    7. Identify the different sampling methods used in quantitative research.
    8. Design a research survey tool that utilizes a quantitative design.

Course Concepts:

  1. Experimental Research Methods and Designs
    2. Quasi-experimental Research Methods and Designs
    3. Quantitative Data Analysis and the use of Variables
    6. Validity and Threats to Validity
    7. Ethics and Values
    8. Utilizing Survey Research
    9. Sampling Methods and Techniques

COURSE RESOURCES

PRIMARY RESOURCES:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. (2016). Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach. (5th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. (2015). Research methods: The essential knowledge base. (2nd. ed.). Boston, MA. Cengage Learning.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Please refer to weekly modules for required resources.

 

Course Outline

Section 1: Introduction to Descriptive and Correlational Designs

Week 1

Assignment Title: Describing Descriptive Research

Assignment Points: 10

Week 2

Assignment Title: Compose a Chart of Correlational Techniques and Statistical Methods

Assignment Points: 5

Week 3

Assignment Title: Describe Data Presentation for Both Descriptive and Correlation Designs

Assignment Points: 10

Section 2: Understanding Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Designs

Week 4

Assignment Title: Compose a Mock Interview of the Merits and Weaknesses of Quasi-Experimental Designs

Assignment Points: 10

Week 5

Assignment Title: Explain Experimental Designs and Analysis

Assignment Points: 10

Week 6

Assignment Title: Prepare a Tutorial on Presenting Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Designs Data

Assignment Points: 10

Section 3: Sampling and Survey Research in Quantitative Designs

Week 7

Assignment Title: Prepare an Annotated Outline of Sampling Techniques

Assignment Points: 5

Week 8

Assignment Title: Select Survey Tools

Assignment Points: 10

Section 4: Validity in Quantitative Designs

Week 9

Assignment Title: Locate Research Articles

Assignment Points: Non-Graded

Week 10

Assignment Title: Identifying Major Threats to Validity

Assignment Points: 10

Section 5: Signature Assignment

Week 11

Assignment Title: Work on Signature Assignment

Assignment Points: Non-Graded

Week 12

Assignment Title: Design a Research Survey Tool that Utilizes a Quantitative Design

Assignment Points: 20

 

COURSE CONTENT

Section 1:

Quantitative research designs are the hallmark of research in academic literature. Quantitative research is about quantifying information using statistical analysis, and drawing relationships between the statistics and the variables being examined.

The designs with quantitative research include descriptive designs, and correlational designs, quasi-experimental designs, and classic experimental designs. Each of these designs will be examined as part of this course. All these designs use deductive reasoning. This means the researcher crafts a problem statement, develops a hypothesis, collects data to understand the research problem identified collects and analyzes data, and reaches conclusions based on the analysis of the data.

It is a good idea to think of these research designs along a continuum in which at one boundary of the continuum are designs in which variables are not controlled (descriptive and correlational designs) while on the other boundary of the continuum are the designs in which variables are controlled and relationships can be explained (quasi-experimental and experimental designs).

In this section, you will review these designs and examine how these designs are used in research.

Week 1:

Descriptive Designs

Descriptive design records what is observed, described, and documented. This design does not establish causality; instead it only establishes that there is an association between variables. There is no experimental or random selection of groups. This involves collecting data that will provide a description of what is being studied. This can be a description of a sample, a group, a dataset, or circumstances. Some researchers refer to descriptive designs as descriptive nonexperimental research. Thinking back to our continuum, nonexperimental designs and experimental designs are different as only experimental designs can establish a causal relationship between variables so that relationships can be explained.

Descriptive design research typically does not begin with a hypothesis. Instead, the researcher normally develops one after data has been collected. This design follows a systematic collection of data. Some examples of descriptive research designs are a description of eating habits of adolescents; a description of the voting inclinations of older adults, or a description of the behaviors of youth in residential placement.

The research results of a descriptive design also employ descriptive statistics which describe the basic features of information in a study. These statistics include measures of central tendency, a description of the distribution of a sample, and measures such as the mean, median and mode.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapters 4 and 5

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapter 1 (pages 15-16), Chapter 8 (pages 221-224), & Chapter 11 (pages 291-295)

Website Link(s)

Key Elements of a Research Proposal Quantitative Design http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/researchcourse/develop_quantitative.html
Review website

Document/Other

PSY7106 Answer Key, Week 1
PSY7106-Answer-Key_Week 1.pdf
Review answer key for Jackson text activities

PSY7106 Answer Key, Week 1
PSY7106-Answer-Key_Week_1.pdf
Review answer key for Trochim, Donnelly, & Arora text activities

Assignment Title

Describing Descriptive Research

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

Warm-Up Activity 1.1: Complete Exercises

This week you will practice calculating the mean, median, and mode, and percentile ranks by completing the following exercises in your textbook. Once you are done, compare your answers against this week’s exercise answer guide, located under your weekly resources.

  • Chapter 5 Exercises in Jackson (2016) questions 3 and 5 page 138.
  • Chapter 11 Exercises in Trochim, Donnelly, & Arora, (2015) pages 302 and 303.

Spotlight on Skills: Academic Integrity

Throughout your coursework you will be asked to review the work of others, make critiques, and provide your own solutions to issues and problems related to the field. During this process you must be scrupulous in distinguishing between your work and the work of others. One way of doing this is through integrity in writing. Northcentral University considers it a violation of Academic Integrity to knowingly submit another person’s work and present it as that of the student’s, without properly citing the source of the work.

  • Carefully note that Northcentral University’s Academic Integrity code requires not only that the student abstain from presenting the work of another as his or her own work, but also that the student properly cite the source of the work.
  • Northcentral University considers it the responsibility of the student to become familiar with how to properly cite sources. All students are required to successfully fill out the Academic Integrity Questionnaire at the beginning of their course of studies, thus confirming their understanding of the Integrity policy and their commitment to adhering to that policy.
  • Instructors are required to provide a sample of each student’s work to the turnitin service, which checks each paper for similarity to original works and papers turned in by students in hundreds of other universities.
  • The student is responsible for understanding and adhering to the Academic Integrity Policy and for avoiding all instances of plagiarism in writing. Violations of the Northcentral University Integrity Code are reported by the Instructor to the School and a series of consequences follow, ranging from being required to revise the paper within 3 days (first violation only) to grade penalties, course failures, and dismissal from the university.
  • APA Central offers several tutorials on scholarly writing. Explore these Tutorials within the Learn menu; you will need to create an account to access the material. Ethical Standards in Research and Writing and How to Avoid Plagiarism and Self-Plagiarism are recommended. APA Central also offers Self-Quizzes to check your knowledge.

Assignment

Your task this week is to locate three peer-reviewed articles that report on studies conducted in psychology using descriptive design.

Then, evaluate and discuss the key points of each design (such as how the data are described; how the data are represented, etc.) from the three selected studies. Provide a detailed description of each study regarding the design that was utilized and the type of descriptive statistics that were conducted.

Finally, include the permalinks to, or copies of each study, for your instructor.

Length: 5-7 pages

Your paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Week 2:

Correlational Designs

Correlational designs attempt to determine how related two or more variables are to each other. This design involves both the measurement of two or more variables and includes the assessment of the relationship between or among those variables. This type of design can help researchers to identify developments, repetitions, or patterns in data.

Variables are not manipulated in this design. As with descriptive design, cause and effect cannot be determined using the correlational design because while it may show a relationship it does not necessarily show that the two variables actually have anything to do with each other. So this design is appropriate for looking at the strength of relationships such as the relationship between having pets and increased happiness, or the relationship between obesity and heart disease. Correlations can also help researchers in making predictions regarding one variable in relation to another.

A correlation is also a measure (method) for statistics that ranges from +1 to -1. A zero correlation indicates there is no relationship between the variables being measured. If a positive correlation is shown, it means that both variables move in the same direction.

If positive or negative correlations exist, it means as one variable goes up, the other goes down. These statistics can include a correlational coefficient which determines the strength of relationships (Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient) and advanced statistic such as regression analysis.

There are a number of ways to calculate a correlation such as the Pearson product moment correlation in which both variables are measured at an interval level. With two ordinal variables, for example, the Spearman Rank Order Correlation would be used. SPSS, the most commonly used software program, will allow you to select which type of correlation you want to use. The statistical formulas for the correlations will be different because of the type of data you are using for the formulas – but the basic idea is the same. Each of these correlations estimates the relationship between two variables.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapter 6

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapter 11, Section 4D (pages 295-301)

Website Link(s)

Key Elements of a Research Proposal Quantitative Design http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/researchcourse/develop_quantitative.html
Review website

Document/Other

PSY7106 Answer Key, Week 2
PSY7106-Answer-Key_Week 2.pdf
Review answer key for Jackson text activities

Assignment Title

Compose a Chart of Correlational Techniques and Statistical Methods

Assignment Points

5

Assignment Instructions

Warm-Up Activity 2.1: Complete Exercises

This week, you will practice correlation methods and statistics by completing the following exercises in your textbook. Once you are done, compare your answers against this week’s exercise answer guide, located under your weekly resources.

  • Chapter 6 Exercises in Jackson (2016) questions 1, 3, and 5 on pages 167 – 168.

Warm-Up Activity 2.2: Preparing a Chart

To prepare a chart for use in an assignment is quite easy. A chart is essentially a table in which you have established categories for review. To create a table in Word, you will need to go to Insert>Insert Table, then select the number of columns and rows you desire.

Heads up on the Signature Assignment

Your Signature Assignment, due in Week 12, requires you to create a research survey tool that utilizes a quantitative design and discuss its merits. The survey will be created and submitted in Week 8. After receiving feedback from your faculty, you will utilize the knowledge and skills that you developed throughout this course to describe the development and evaluation of a quantitative survey instrument. This will include describing: 1) steps to develop the instrument; 2) the construct under examination; 3) the participants; 4) procedures assessing reliability and validity; 5) the ability to avoid bias and ensure ethical guidelines are followed; 6) the type of analysis you would use; 7) the results would be likely; and 8) the evaluation of the instrument’s properties.

Review the Week 12 assignment instructions for details on the expectations for your Signature Assignment.

Assignment

For this task, compose a chart of the four types of correlation coefficients, give an example of when you would use each of these correlations, and what type of research question would be a good match for this method. For example, your chart may appear as:

 

Conclude your chart with a reflective summary in which you explain the essential features of each of the statistical methods.

Length: 1-2 page chart, 1-2 page summary

Your chart paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Week 3:

Data Presentation for Both Designs

Both of the designs you reviewed in previous weeks offer basic information about data. Descriptive designs and resulting statistics can be composed of everything that can be counted (e.g., gender, age, height, weight). Correlational designs can help us determine the degree of relationship between two variables. Each design has specific ways in which data are prepared and presented. Descriptive statistics include summaries of distributions, measures of central tendency, and describing variability. Correlations and how they are calculated and presented informs us about how two things perform in a synchronous manner.

There are several ways to prepare and present both types of designs, and their statistical formulas. This can occur through numerical representation of data, graphical representation of data, and a summary in narrative format.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignment.

All resources for this week:

Website Link(s)

Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Institute on Climate and Planets. ICP’s guide for presenting your research. http://icp.giss.nasa.gov/education/presentation/
Review website

Hussain, M. (2012). Descriptive statistics – presenting your results I. Journal of Pakistan Medical Association, 741-743. http://www.jpma.org.pk/PdfDownload/3569.pdf
Review website

Research Methods Knowledge Base. Correlation. Web Center for Social Research Methods. http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/statcorr.php
Review website

Document/Other

PowerPoint Tutorial http://learners.ncu.edu/public_images/mentor_affairs/training/Writingcenter/Successful_ppt.pdf
Review tutorial

Assignment Title

Describe Data Presentation for Both Descriptive and Correlation Designs

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

Spotlight on Skills: Developing a PowerPoint Presentation

For this assignment, you will prepare a PowerPoint Presentation. For help in using this tool, review the PowerPoint Tutorial located under your weekly resources.

Assignment

For this task, imagine that you were asked to present to a class of master’s level students who are enrolled in their first quantitative research methods course. Create a PowerPoint presentation that explains how you would ‘teach’ the concepts you have learned regarding how to describe data presentation for both descriptive and correlation designs.

Be sure to include the following in your presentation:

  • An overview of both descriptive and correlational designs.
  • An explanation of how data are presented regarding each design.
  • Note the strengths and limitations of each design.

Incorporate appropriate animations, transitions, and graphics as well as “speaker notes” for each slide. The speaker notes may be comprised of brief paragraphs or bulleted lists.

Support your presentation with at least five scholarly resources. In addition to these specified resources, other appropriate scholarly resources may be included.

Length: 12-15 slides (with a separate reference slide)

Notes Length: 200-350 words for each slide

Be sure to include citations for quotations and paraphrases with references in APA format and style where appropriate. Save the file as PPT with the correct course code information.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Section 2:

In this section, you will be immersed in the world of quasi-experimental and experimental designs. Both designs have much in common. For example, the intent of both is to examine the cause of particular occurrences or experiences. In both designs, participants are exposed to certain kinds of conditions or treatments. With both quasi-experimental and experimental designs, an outcome that is important to the researcher is measured and the researcher tests whether changes in the outcome are related to the treatment. The significant element of both experiments and quasi-experimental designs is the measure of the dependent variable, which it allows for comparison.

However, while both designs share similar characteristics, there is one main difference between the two designs. Quasi-experimental designs lack the element of random assignment. When researchers utilize random assignment, participants have the same opportunity of being designated to a particular treatment condition. Random assignment confirms that both the experimental and control groups are equivalent. In a quasi-experimental design, assignment to a given treatment condition is based on some criteria rather than random assignment because participants cannot be randomly assigned or selected to groups.

Week 4:

Quasi-Experimental Designs

Quasi-experimental designs are used to assess a causal relationship between variables. This is what primarily distinguishes this research design from descriptive and correlational designs. Quasi-experimental designs are often used in psychological research to establish cause-effect relationships among variables.

Unlike experimental designs, quasi-experimental designs are used when random assignment is not possible or practical. Quasi-experimental designs involve selecting groups, so with these groups a variable is tested without any random pre-selection processes.

Therefore, the identified control groups exposed to the treatment variable are studied and compared to groups that are not exposed to the variable. When analyses is conducted and conclusions are drawn, determining causes must be done with careful attention, as other variables, both known and unknown, can still impact the outcome.

Basic quasi-experimental designs include (a) single group post-test only designs, (b) single group pretest/posttest design, (c) single-group time-series design, (d) nonequivalent control group posttest-only design, (e) nonequivalent control group pretest/posttest design and (f) multiple-group time-series design (Jackson, 2016) Quasi-experimental designs can be developed and calculated in a more sophisticated manner than descriptive or correlation designs because they attempt to establish cause-effect relationships among the variables. Some examples of causal-correlational research or quasi-experimental design application would be to examine the effect of gender on math readiness; or the effect of youth groups on middle-school boys’ school attendance.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapter 13 (pages 353-374)

Article/Journal

Clark, M., & Shadish, W. (2007). Quasi-experimental method. In N. J. Salkind, & K. Rasmussen (Eds.), Encyclopedia of measurement and statistics (pp. 806-809). Sage Publications, Inc. doi: 10.4135/9781412952644.n369 http://srmo.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/view/encyclopedia-of-measurement-and-statistics/n369.xml?rskey=5RVf56&row=8
Read article

Follmer, A. (2003). Chapter 6 – Design and Analysis of Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Investigations. In Blackwell Handbook of Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. http://www.credoreference.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/entry/bkhrmcp/chapter_6_design_and_analysis_of_experimental_and_quasi_experimental_investigations
Read article

Website Link(s)

Johnson, B. (2000). Toward a New Classification of Nonexperimental Quantitative Research. Educational Researcher. http://www33.homepage.villanova.edu/edward.fierros/pdf/Johnson.pdf
Read article

Leonhardt, D. (2010). The case of the $320,000 kindergarten teachers. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/28/business/economy/28leonhardt.html?_r=3&hpw&
Read article

Document/Other

PSY7106 Answer Key, Week 4
PSY7106-Answer-Key_ Week 4.pdf
Review answer key for Jackson text activities

Assignment Title

Compose a Mock Interview of the Merits and Weaknesses of Quasi-Experimental Designs

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

Warm-Up Activity 4.1: Complete Exercises

This week, you will practice quasi-experimental designs by completing the following exercises in your textbook. Once you are done, compare your answers against this week’s exercise answer guide, located under your weekly resources.

  • Chapter 13 Exercises in Jackson (2016) questions 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 on page 372

Assignment

For this task, you will prepare a mock interview. Assume you were asked to interview a researcher about the merits and weaknesses of quasi-experimental designs. These designs include (a) single group post-test only designs, (b) single group pretest/posttest design, (c) single-group time-series design, (d) nonequivalent control group posttest-only design, (e) nonequivalent control group pretest/posttest design and (f) multiple-group time-series design.

Your interview should be conversational in nature and critically discuss the following questions regarding each of the major Quasi-Experimental Designs:

  1. What are the merits of each of the specific designs?
  2. When should you use each of the specific designs?
  3. What is the statistical analysis that is used for each of the specific designs?
  4. What are the limitations of each of the specific designs?
  5. What is one research question for each of the specific designs (using a topic area that you are interested in)?

For your mock interview, utlize all of this week’s required readings to illustrate points throughout your interview.

Length: 5-7 pages

Your paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Week 5:

Experimental Designs

Experimental designs are considered the strongest of all quantitative designs in psychology because researchers can better control variables, thereby ensuring the validity of the research being conducted.

Unlike quasi-experimental design, experimental designs randomly assign participants. This assists in better establishing causality, and the researcher can conclude possible cause and effect between the variables that are being studied.

Experimental designs also can move from simple designs such as a two-group post-test only randomized experiment to a more sophisticated design such as factorial designs. Experimental designs can include a pretest-posttest control group design, a posttest only control group design, and the multiple experimental groups.

Experimental designs normally range from simple between-subjects design in which just two subject groups are compared a basic assumption for an experiment to within-subject designs in which subjects are matched on one or more variables and randomly assigned to a treatment, and researchers’ observations occur before and after treatment (Jackson, 2015).

In a between-subject experimental design, different participants serve in the control and experimental groups. The researcher is then able to manipulate at least one variable (the independent variable) and measure at least one variable (the dependent variables). Some designs for between-subjects design include a posttest-only control group design or a pretest/posttest control group design.

It is also possible to have two experimental groups and no control group; participants of each group then receive a different level of the independent variable. With this type of design we would use inferential statistical tests that fit a bell-shaped distribution. Statistical tests for this type of design include the independent-groups t test. Experimental designs also include within-subjects designs in which the same participants are used in all conditions. This type of design is also referred to as a repeated-measures design because the researcher is repeatedly taking measurements on the same participants.

Another type of experimental design is a matched-subject design. This type of design is similar to both between and within-subjects designs in that different participants are used in each condition and for a participant in one condition, there is a participant in other conditions who matches that participant on some important variable or variables. Statistical analysis for repeated-measures and matched-subject designs includes the correlated-groups t test, and calculating the effect size.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapters 9 & 10

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapter 9

Article/Journal

Follmer, A. (2003). Chapter 6 – Design and Analysis of Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Investigations. In Blackwell Handbook of Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. http://www.credoreference.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/entry/bkhrmcp/chapter_6_design_and_analysis_of_experimental_and_quasi_experimental_investigations
Read article

Knight, K (2010). Study/experimental/research design: Much more than statistics. Journal of Athletic Training 2010, 45(1):98–100. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2808761/?report=classic
Review article

Website Link(s)

Key Elements of a Research Proposal Quantitative Design http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/researchcourse/develop_quantitative.html
Review website

Document/Other

PSY7106 Answer Key, Week 5
PSY7106-Answer-Key_Week 5.pdf
Review answer key for Jackson text activities

Assignment Title

Explain Experimental Designs and Analysis

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

Warm-Up Activity 5.1: Complete Exercises

This week, you will practice examining validity and within-subjects and matched-subjects designs by completing the following exercises in your textbook. Once you are done, compare your answers against week’s exercise answer guide, located under your weekly resources.

  • In Jackson, answer questions 1 and 3 on page 252-253. Review Statistical Software Resources for Independent Groups t Test on pages 257-259, in Chapter 9.
  • In Jackson, answer questions 3 and 5 on page 274 in Chapter 10.

Assignment

For this task, you will create and complete a summary, answering the following questions related to this study:

In an experimental study of exercise on arousal, subjects are randomly assigned to either the no exercise or the exercise condition. Identify what type of study this is (between or within). In addition, identify the independent and dependent variable and the control and experimental group. Also identify the null and experimental hypothesis for this study.

Your summary should include all of the following information:

  • Type of study: (between subjects or within subjects)
  • Independent variable:
  • Dependent variable:
  • Control group:
  • Experimental group:
  • H1:
  • H0:

Length: 1 page

Your summary should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

4.0. Examine validity and threats to validity in quantitative designs.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Week 6:

Data Presentation for Both Designs

Once a researcher has determined which design will be used and the experiment to be conducted, the next step is presenting the data collected. Presenting the data can take several forms that include graphs, charts, and tables. When presenting data, the researcher displays the data and also justifies why a particular design is used. For example, presenting data for an experimental design could be in the form of a table reflecting the results of an Independent Sample t test (please review the APA manual). For a quasi-experimental design, a researcher might use a graph to represent and illustrate the data.

When presenting study results researchers develop graphs, tables, other visual displays that reflect the results of the analysis. Data presentation for both these designs can be provided by interpreting t tests and graphing the means as well as determining the effect size.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignment.

All resources for this week:

Article/Journal

Fan, S. (2010) Independent Variable. Encyclopedia of Research Design. SAGE Publications. http://sk.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/reference/researchdesign/n184.xml
Read article

Greenwald, A. G. (1992). Within-subjects designs: To use or not to use? In A. E. Kazdin (Ed.), Methodological Issues & Strategies in Clinical Research (pp. 157-167). American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10109-021 http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=pzh&AN=1992-97624-021&site=ehost-live
Read article

Piasta, S.B., & Justice, L.M. (2010). Cohen’s d Statistic. Encyclopedia of Research Design. SAGE Publications. http://knowledge.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/view/researchdesign/n58.xml
Read article

Wiley, R. (2009) Trade-offs in the design of experiments. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 12(4) 447–449. http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=pdh&AN=com-123-4-447&site=ehost-live
Read article

Assignment Title

Prepare a Tutorial on Presenting Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Designs Data

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

A tutorial is a step-by-step guide with logical steps in which attention to detail is paramount. A tutorial is a set of instructions that guides a reader and the result is that the reader now knows how to do something that they did not know how to do before.

For this task, you will prepare a tutorial on quasiexperimental and experimental designs. Your tutorial will serve as a step by step guide as to how you would use statistical analysis in both designs.

Support your tutorial with at least 5 references from scholarly sources.

Length: 5-7 pages

Your tutorial should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Section 3:

Sampling is the cornerstone of research in psychology. Sampling is a way of studying a subset of a population, because studying an entire population would be nearly impossible. A sample needs to represent the larger population on characteristics that are important to the researcher. Sampling is a process of selecting components and elements from a population of interest to the researcher studying the sample; the researcher is able to generalize results to the larger population from which the sample was selected.

Sampling is divided into two approaches: probability and nonprobability. Probabilistic sampling utilizes random sampling. In probabilistic sampling, all individuals in a population have some level of opportunity of being included in a sample, and the numerical probability that any one individual will be selected can be calculated.

In nonprobabilistic sampling, population features are chosen on the basis of their accessibility or because the researcher believes the sample’s features are representative of the larger population.

Sampling is an important part of survey research. Using the principles of sampling, a researcher gathers information from a sample of participants typically in a manner that makes it likely to generalize results to the population.

Survey research can include questionnaires or measures that can be administered online or through the mail. Another method of survey research is personal interviews.

Week 7:

Review of Sampling Methods

Several sampling methods can be used in quantitative research. For example, simple random sampling is a method in which a researcher could have access to an entire population. However, few researchers have the time or resources to utilize this method. Instead, other methods of sampling can be used to reach the researcher’s population of interest.

For example, selective methods can be used such as purposive and snowball sampling to target specific groups. Convenience methods can be used such as convenience sampling when the target group is readily available. Another type of sampling in which convenience is important is quota sampling where accessibility and suitability are a priority and the focus is on ensuring that the sample is comparable to the population on certain qualities and attributes. Other methods include probability methods such as simple random sampling, cluster sampling, stratified sampling, and systematic sampling.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignment.

 

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapter 4 (pages 96-99)

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapters 4 and 7

Article/Journal

McCready, W. (2006). Applying Sampling Procedures. The Psychology Research Handbook. SAGE Publications. http://knowledge.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/view/hdbk_psychrsch/n10.xml
Read article

Mrug, S. (2010). Survey. Encyclopedia of Research Design. Encyclopedia of Research Design. SAGE Publications. http://sk.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/reference/researchdesign/n449.xml
Read article

Assignment Title

Prepare an Annotated Outline of Sampling Techniques

Assignment Points

5

Assignment Instructions

Warm-Up Activity 7.1: Preparing an Annotated Outline

An outline is the scaffold upon which you build your paper. You probably already use a mental outline when you plan a paper, perhaps without even being aware of it. Writing the outline can give you a visualization of your plan. An outline provides both focus and direction for the paper, shows where relevant points and arguments should be made, and identifies areas where more supportive evidence is needed.

What is an annotated outline?

As you are writing a research paper, your paper is built around the research findings that you located in your search.

When you prepare an annotated outline, you will note the research that supports each section of the paper. This will help you see any areas that need further research to support them.

The following example may help support the transition of your paper from a collection of research notes to a fully developed paper.

Suppose the research topic you chose was the relation of childhood bullying to self-esteem. The title of your paper is: Self-esteem’s relationship to childhood bullying.

When researching the paper, you found conflicting research results. Some research showed that children with low self-esteem tended to bully others, while other research showed that children with extremely high self-esteem were bullies. Looking closer, you began to see that this research could be divided into studies investigating different variables, such as gender, age, and ethnic background. Now, you want to turn this into a research report.

An annotated outline might look like this (all citations are fictional):

Topic: The relationship between childhood bullying and self-esteem: Too much or too little?

  1. Overview of childhood bullying
  2. Definitions of bullying (Simpson, 2010; O’Connor, 2008)
  3. Types of bullying (Yang, 2009; Sinisi, 2011)
  4. Self-esteem in childhood
  5. Definitions of self-esteem (Whitefield, 2009)
  6. Impact of self-esteem on behavior in childhood (Liebermann, 2010)
  7. Research on the relation of self-esteem to bullying in childhood
  8. Gender, self-esteem, and childhood bullying

a.Self-esteem and same gender bullying

(1) Self-esteem in boys bullying boys (Pryzborski, 2012)

(2) Self-esteem in girls bullying girls

  1. Self-esteem in opposite gender or non-gender specific bullying in childhood (no research found)
  2. Age, self-esteem in childhood bullying
  3. Self-esteem and bullying from 6-9 (Brennan, 2011)
  4. Self-esteem and bullying from 9-12 (Mendez, 2010; Lee, 2011)
  5. Family structure, self-esteem and childhood children
  6. Self-esteem and bullying in children in single parent families (Shams, 2012)
  7. Self-esteem and bulling in children in dual parent families (Mugaddam, 2011)
  8. Ethnicity, self-esteem and childhood bullying
  9. Inter-ethnic bullying and self-esteem (Jacinto, 2009; Akbarzadeh, 2010)
  10. Intra-ethnic bullying and self-esteem (Lawrence, 2011)
  11. Conclusions
  12. Summary and suggestions for future studies

Preparing an annotated outline in this way will give you a way to organize and clarify your plans. Additionally, it gives your instructor a chance to provide feedback on the proposed structure of the paper before you begin to write. You can also see which subtopics you need to research further before proceeding with the final draft.

Assignment

For this task, you will prepare an annotated outline comparing the different types of sampling techniques that you read about in the Jackson and Trochim et al. readings for this week.

Headings for the outline should be divided between probability and nonprobability sampling. Each sampling technique should be described, including when it is best to use the particular method, identify the question type for the particular technique, identify the best method to apply to each technique, and list the type of quantitative design that best fits with the sampling technique.

Length: 5 – 7 pages

Your annotated outline should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

6.0. Compare the roles of sampling techniques in quantitative designs.

7.0. Identify the different sampling methods used in quantitative research.

 

Week 8:

Examining Survey Research

Survey research is an organized and specific way in which researchers can gather information about people. Survey research is inexpensive, can be replicated, and a large amount of data can be obtained from many participants in a reasonably short amount of time.

One of the most important aspects of survey research is how well designed the survey is. The researcher must determine the content and types of questions. For example, should they be open-ended questions that allow for more detail, or closed in which respondents simply select a provided answer? Care also needs to be taken to minimize possible biases both of the researcher and of the respondent. A common concern is social desirability, meaning that respondents want to be viewed in a positive light and therefore may not answer the survey honestly.

Survey instruments also must be understandable to a wide range or participants. Therefore, questions should not be too lengthy or invade privacy, and should avoid ambiguity.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignment.

All resources for this week:

Website Link(s)

Fan, W. & Yan, Z (2010). Factors affecting response rates of the web survey: A systematic review. Computers in Human Behavior 26, 132–139. http://ac.els-cdn.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/S0747563209001708/1-s2.0-S0747563209001708-main.pdf?_tid=0b3a711e-78ef-11e4-8c1f-00000aab0f27&acdnat=1417393061_eb03a108f7e91aee5fcb039af1d5e906
Read article

Pew Research Center. (2014). Questionnaire Design. http://www.people-press.org/methodology/questionnaire-design/
Review website

Survey Monkey https://www.surveymonkey.com/mp/survey-templates
Review website

Survey Research. Web Center for Social Research Methods. http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/survey.php
Review website

Tourangeau & Yan (2007). Sensitive questions in surveys. Psychological Bulletin, 133(5) 859–883. http://www.learnlab.org/research/wiki/images/a/a8/Tourangeau_SensitiveQuestions.pdf
Review website

Article/Journal

Mrug, S. (2010). Survey. Encyclopedia of Research Design. Encyclopedia of Research Design. SAGE Publications. http://sk.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/reference/researchdesign/n449.xml
Read article

Assignment Title

Select Survey Tools

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

Unlike many assignments that you complete in courses, a dissertation or manuscript is submitted frequently for review by several scholars for revision and resubmission. In the same way, you will submit your best work for review and resubmission in this course.

This week, you will complete work that will ultimately lead to your Signature Assignment. You will submit your work for feedback from the faculty member. Then, you must integrate the faculty’s feedback or provide a scholarly rationale (on a separate sheet of paper to include in the appendix of the Signature Assignment) to explain why you did not integrate his/her feedback. The rationale for this decision should reveal that you are preparing to become an independent scholar.

For this task, you will analyze and assess a number of free online survey tools that researchers can use to collect data, and then write an essay explaining your findings.

  1. First, search the Internet for free online survey tools such as those found at https://www.surveymonkey.com/mp/survey-templatesand review the survey template examples (go to Academic Surveys). Review the examples and compare two on factors such as options, usability and determine the cost through a service such as SurveyMonkey.
  2. Second, determine a topic area that could be researched using a quantitative measurement.
  3. Third, determine a variable that could be measured using a quantitative design.
  4. Fourth, prepare a short four-item instrument that measures a variable related to your selected topic area.
  5. Fifth, identify your population of interest if you were to use these tools to measure the selected variable. Explain how you might most effectively reach participants to recruit to complete your online instrument. Describe whether your approach would differ if you were recruiting participants to complete the same instrument in person.
  6. Sixth, pretend that you are a participant. Complete the instruments you have created. Describe your experience as a participant with regard to factors, such as ease of readability, and time to complete.
  7. Finally, as an independent scholar, you will have to decide which data-collection strategy is most appropriate, given the problem statement, purpose, and research questions of the study. Discuss the advantages and limitations of collecting data online versus in person. Also, discuss possible topics that might be better suited for online data collection as opposed to in person.

Support your assertions with citations to five peer-reviewed resources.

Length: 5-7 pages

Your paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

6.0. Compare the roles of sampling techniques in quantitative designs.

7.0. Identify the different sampling methods used in quantitative research.

 

Section 4:

Validity is used to determine whether research measures what it intends to measure. In quantitative research, there are four main types of validity:

  1. External validity is the extent to which the results of a research study can be generalized from a sample to a population. For quantitative research, the concept of external validity is important because researchers must be able to state conclusions can be generalized.
  2. Internal validity is a means by which researchers can rule-out plausible alternative (or rival) explanations regarding their results. In this manner, the researcher can show that there is a causal relationship between a treatment and an outcome.
  3. Construct validity also referred to as content validity, refers to the suitability of the content of an instrument in reference to a study. Frequently, it is defined as the extent to which a researcher’s measure or instrument actually measures what it is intended to measure (Trochim, Donnelly, & Arora, 2015).
  4. Conclusion validity is the degree to which conclusions that are made about relationships in data are reasonable. Conclusion validity is relevant whenever a research is looking at relationships between variables, including cause-and-effect relationships (Trochim, Donnelly, & Arora, 2015).

Reference

Trochim, T., M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. (2015). Research methods: The essential knowledge base (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Week 9:

Four Types of Validity in Quantitative Research

When researchers determine whether their results can be trusted, there are two important issues that should be considered. One is external validity, which is the validity of generalizing the sample data to a population, and the other is internal validity, which involves the extent to which the dependent variable can be credited to changes in the independent variable.

In experimental research, the researcher manipulates at least one independent variable (such as the hypothesis/cause) then attempts to control any potential confounding variables, and then measures the effect(s) on one or more of the dependent variables. Validity helps us to determine that if these steps are taken – if the researcher is following the rules of internal and external validity.

Therefore, internal validity is important for studies that attempt to determine cause-and-effect – it helps us determine if a treatment, intervention, or program made a difference. Internal validity means that the researcher has evidence that what was done in the study (i.e., intervention) caused what the researcher observed (i.e., the outcome) to happen (Research Methods Knowledge Base).

External validity assumes that there is a causal relationship in a study between the constructs of the cause and the effect, and that the research can generalize this effect to other persons, places or times (Trochim, 2008).

The four validity types (conclusion validity, internal validity, construct validity, and external validity) build upon one another. In this sense they are cumulative as seen in this diagram.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapter 9 (pages 235-244)

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapter 3 (pp. 67-71),Chapter 5 (pp.127-140),Chapter 9 (pp. 234-235), & Chapter 11(pp. 281-287)

Website Link(s)

Internal Validity. Web Center for Social Research Methods. http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/intval.php
Review website

Introduction to Validity.Web Center for Social Research Methods. http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/introval.php
Review website

Reliability and Validity http://wadsworth.cengage.com/psychology_d/templates/student_resources/workshops/res_methd/reli_vali/reli_vali_01.html
Review website

Assignment Title

Locate Research Articles

Assignment Points

Non-Graded

Assignment Instructions

This week you will locate at least five research articles to support your Week 10 assignment, which will have you charting and describing the major threats to validity for conclusion, construct, and external validity, and explaining how you would minimize them for internal validity.

Length: 5 references

You do not need to submit any documents this week.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

4.0. Examine validity and threats to validity in quantitative designs.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Week 10:

Threats to Validity in Quantitative Research

Each type of validity (conclusion, internal, construct, and external) has unique threats that may jeopardize research findings if they are not addressed.

Threats to conclusion validity, according to Trochim, Donnelly, and Arora (2015) are factors that can lead researchers to reach an incorrect conclusion about a relationship in the observations. One type of error is a Type I Error in which a researcher concludes that there is a relationship, when in fact there is not. Another threat is a Type II error in which no relationship is found when in fact there is one (Trochim, Donnelly, & Arora, 2015).

Threats to internal validity include statistical regression to the mean; mortality (attrition); maturation; and history effects.

Threats to construct validity may include the choice of treatment (or intervention) and such things as carryover effects, also known as order effects, in which a study uses repeated measures and participants become sensitized to the measures.

Threats to external validity include participants (sample) being nonrepresentative of the population of interest. An example of this would be the inability of the research results to be generalized across settings.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments.

Reference

Trochim, T., M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. (2015). Research methods: The essential knowledge base (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapter 9 (pages 235-251)

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapter 4(pp. 103-105),Chapter 5(pp. 135-141),Chapter 8(pp. 211-219), & Chapter 11(pp. 282-287)

Document/Other

PSY7106 Answer Key, Week 10
PSY7106-Answer-Key_Week_10.pdf
Review answer key for Trochim, T., M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. text activities

Website Link(s)

Yu, C. & Ohlund, B (2012). Threats to validity of Research Design. http://www.creative-wisdom.com/teaching/WBI/threat.shtml
Read article

Assignment Title

Identifying Major Threats to Validity

Assignment Points

10

Assignment Instructions

Warm-Up Activity 10.1: Complete Exercises

This week, you will practice writing about validity by completing the following exercises in your textbook. Once you are done, compare your answers against this week’s exercise answer guide, which is located on pp. 381-383 in the Trochim, Donnelly, and Arora textbook.

  • In Trochim, T., M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. (2015): Complete Chapter 8 exercise questions, pages 225-227

Warm-Up Activity 10.2: Preparing a Chart

To prepare a chart for use in an assignment is quite easy. A chart is essentially a table in which you have established categories for review. To create a table in Word, you will need to go to Insert>Insert Table, then select the number of columns and rows you desire.

Assignment

This week’s assignment consists of two parts. For this task, you will:

  • Create a detailed chart of major threats to validity for conclusion, construct and external validity.
  • Write an essay that describes the major threats and how you would minimize them for internal validity.

Part 1

Create a chart, noting three types of threats for conclusion, construct, and external validity. The following is an example of how you may want to organize your chart. In column 1, specify the specific threat; in column 2, provide a description of this threat; and in column 3, include a brief description of the method that is used to minimize the threat.

 

Part 2

After you have completed your chart, prepare an essay in which you thoroughly describe the major threats to validity in external validity and explain how you would minimize the threats. Support your essay with five references. Support your essay with five references.

Length: 3 pages for the chart; 2-3 page essay

Your chart and paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

4.0. Examine validity and threats to validity in quantitative designs.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

 

Section 5:

In this section, you will learn about many of the issues related to administering tests. For example, a researcher might wonder whether it is more appropriate to have participants complete instruments in-person or online. This and all research decisions should have a scholarly basis. That is, they should not be based merely on convenience. It is also important for researchers to consider the demographic characteristics of the participants who are completing the instrument because bias and certain ethical issues might be of concern.

Week 11:

This week, you will learn about the issues surrounding the use of online instruments from a researcher’s as well as a participant’s point of view. You will also gain an understanding of why it is important to consider the participants when administering tests for reasons, such as participant dropout due to the scale being too long or difficult to access. Further, you will learn about issues related to test administration, interpretation, and use, including bias.

The key issues when considering the use of a survey include the construction of the survey (open versus close-ended questions); if you are using a rating scale, how you will be administering the survey (such as in-person, mail, telephone, or online); and what type of sampling techniques you will use.

Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignment.

All resources for this week:

Book(s)

Jackson, S. L. 2016 Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach.
Read Chapter 4 (pages 88-101)

Trochim, T.M., Donnelly, J., & Arora, A. 2015 Research methods: The essential knowledge base.
Read Chapter 7

Article/Journal

Couper, M.P., Traugott, M.W., & Lamias, M.J. (2001). Web survey design and administration. Public Opinion Quarterly, 65(2), 230-253. http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=4939116&site=eds-live
Read article

Mahon-Haft, T. A., & Dillman, D. A. (2010). Does visual appeal matter? Effects of web survey aesthetics on survey quality. Journal of the European Research Association, 4(1), 43-59. https://ojs.ub.uni-konstanz.de/srm/article/view/2264/3977
Read article

Mayerson, P., & Tryon, W. W. (2003). Validating internet research: A test of the psychometric equivalence of Internet and in-person samples. Behavior Research Methods Instruments & Computers, 35(4), 614-620. http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edswss&AN=000187916000015&site=eds-live
Read article

Naglieri, J. A., Drasgow, F., Schmit, M., Handler, L., Prifitera, A., Margolis, A., & Velasquez, R. (2004). Psychological testing on the internet: New problems, old issues. American Psychologist, 59(3), 150-162. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.59.3.150 http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=pdh&AN=2004-14611-001&site=eds-live
Read article

Assignment Title

Work on Signature Assignment

Assignment Points

Non-Graded

Assignment Instructions

This week you will work on your Signature Assignment, which is due in Week 12. Your Signature Assignment requires you to design a research survey tool that utilizes a quantitative design, and then you will discuss its merits.

You will utilize the knowledge and skills that you developed throughout this course to describe the development and evaluation of a quantitative survey instrument. This will include describing: 1) steps to develop the instrument; 2) the construct under examination; 3) the participants; 4) procedures assessing reliability and validity; 5) avoiding bias and ensuring ethical guidelines are followed; 6) what type of analysis you would use; 7) what results would be likely; and 8) evaluating the properties of the instrument.

You do not need to submit any documents this week.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

3.0. Analyze ethics in quantitative research.

4.0. Examine validity and threats to validity in quantitative designs.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

6.0. Compare the roles of sampling techniques in quantitative designs.

7.0. Identify the different sampling methods used in quantitative research.

8.0. Design a research survey tool that utilizes a quantitative design.

 

Week 12:

Signature Assignment

In this assignment you will demonstrate the knowledge and skills that you developed throughout this course to complete the Signature Assignment in which you will describe the development and evaluation of an instrument.

 

All resources for this week:

No Books & Resources available.

Assignment Title

Design a Research Survey Tool that Utilizes a Quantitative Design

Assignment Points

20

Assignment Instructions

This week, complete your Signature Assignment, which will require you to design a research survey tool that utilizes a quantitative design.

Be sure your Signature Assignment will include the following parts:

  1. Introduction (3-4 pages)
  2. a) Describe the construct under examination. Explain why it is important to examine it and the consequences of not doing so. Include a minimum of three citations to relevant scholarly sources.
  3. Method (3 pages)
  4. a) Describe the participants, instrument, and procedure used to construct the instrument.
  5. Steps (3 pages)
  6. a) Assume a factor analysis has been completed and the instrument has been developed, assess the reliability and validity. Discuss the steps that you should take to assess the reliability and validity of the instrument.
  7. b) Describe the steps that should be taken to avoid bias.
  8. c) Describe the steps that should be taken to ensure that ethical guidelines are followed.
  9. Issues (2 pages)
  10. a) Describe administration issues that you must overcome.
  11. Results (3 pages)
  12. a) Describe the types of analysis you would use and suggest what results likely would be seen.
  13. Discussion (2-3 pages)
  14. a) Evaluate the properties of the instrument, how you would revise or improve it, and recommendations for further study of the instrument.
  15. Reference List
  16. a) Include at least 10 scholarly sources in your paper.
  17. Appendix
  18. a) Include the actual measure in the appendix of the paper.
  19. b) Scholarly rationale for not including faculty feedback into your assignment (if applicable).

Note: In this assignment, you will integrate your faculty’s feedback from your Week 8 Assignment OR provide a scholarly rationale for why you did not integrate it on a separate sheet of paper to be included in the appendix of the Signature Assignment.

Length: 16-18 pages (not including reference list or appendix)

Your paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts presented in the course by providing new thoughts and insights relating directly to the topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be careful to adhere to Northcentral’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Upload your assignment using the Upload Assignment button below.

Course Learning Outcomes associated with this assignment:

1.0. Identify the types of quantitative research design.

2.0. Apply quantitative research methods to your identified research problem and evaluating methods usage in research.

3.0. Analyze ethics in quantitative research.

4.0. Examine validity and threats to validity in quantitative designs.

5.0. Evaluate aspects of quantitative designs.

6.0. Compare the roles of sampling techniques in quantitative designs.

7.0. Identify the different sampling methods used in quantitative research.

8.0. Design a research survey tool that utilizes a quantitative design.

 

 

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By | 2018-10-31T15:30:59+00:00 October 31st, 2018|Psychology|